Do Hiring Managers Hate My Resume?

March 19, 2018

Getting hired depends, in good measure, on the feelings you as the job seeker create in the hearts of hiring managers.  Is the hiring manager excited you applied?  Are they looking forward to having you, and your skill-set, as part of their team?  Are they eager to see you develop and grow, as you help the company evolve and grow as well?  Or are you going to be one of the many job applicants whose resume sparks no interest and excites no hiring manager

 

That is what makes hiring managers hate a resume, and that is what we’ll tackle in this article. If you're not sure, have your resume reviewed for free by a professional resume writing service in AZ.

What makes hiring managers hate your resume?

If you’re not getting called in for a lot of interviews, then hiring managers probably hate your resume.  A lot of things can go wrong when creating such a document, but we will focus on the biggest issues, and the issues that seem to be popping up most of the time.  If after following these tips you still see a low amount of invitations, you might want to consider hiring a local certified resume writer in Arizona to help you iron out your resume and cover letter.

 

Generic, time-wasting content on your resume!

If there’s a single rule to follow when creating a resume, then that would be: the more relevant, the better.  Generic content, which includes buzzwords like ‘team player’, or ‘good communicator’ does nothing to really describe you as a candidate, and it’s just wasting the recruiters’ time.  This is one of the many things they hate the most.  Time-wasting content is a close second, which includes your primary and high school education, volunteering which has nothing to do with the industry you’re applying for, or pretty much any other content which is completely unrelated to the job position in question.

Cheap tricks on a resume

Trying to trick the Applicant Tracking Software (ATS) system is another thing that ranks high on the list of things that make hiring managers hate your resume.  Adding a ton of keywords in white text so that you pass the scan, adding unrelated buzzwords for the same purpose, or using any other fraudulent tactic will get you nowhere.

 

 

Lies and false statements on a resume

If you say that you speak three languages, then you better be speaking three languages, because things like this grab the hiring managers’ attention and you will definitely be asked about it.  Avoid false statements and lies, as those things will not only lose you the job opportunity, but you will close many other doors for yourself that way.  Stay honest and professional.

 

 

What makes hiring managers love a resume?

Now that you know the basics of what to avoid when writing a resume, we will now move on to things hiring managers love to see in a resume.

 

 

Having a keyword-oriented resume

Keywords, keywords, keywords!  Actionable keywords. Have you accomplished something so far in your career?  Then use the word ‘accomplished’, it’s a great keyword. Improved on something?  Succeeded?  Managed?  Led?  Trained? Developed? These are the things hiring managers crave for, and they’ll love you for it.

 

 

Having a detailed, metrics-rich resume

Another thing that is essential for a well-crafted resume, is going into details and being rich in metrics.  If you’ve worked somewhere, don’t stop at just saying where you worked.  Go into greater detail on what your tasks were and how you went about completing them.  Use as many metrics as possible.  That makes it easier for hiring managers to visualize your success and visualize you as part of their team.

 

 

Being concise and straight to the point

Seriously, there are pretty good chances you’ve been to high school, and even better chances that hiring managers know that.  On top of it all, such information does nothing to describe either you as an individual, or a professional, and as such is completely irrelevant to the recruiters.  They will be thankful for you omitting that information, as they’ll notice you actually thought about their time when creating a resume.

 

 

Ticking all the right boxes

Passing the automated tracking software system (ATS) is just part of the battle.  You also need to woo and inspire the recruiters enough to call you in for an interview.  After that, you need to prepare for the final push and impress at the interview, as well.  But all of this will be impossible to achieve if your resume is poorly written and doesn’t spark the recruiters’ interest.

 

When creating an impressive and professionally written resume, it is essential to have that one question in mind: “What would the hiring manager want to read on my resume?”  Keeping that question in mind will always keep you on the road to success, without deviation.  Suddenly, you’ll realize you’ve been adding too much useless information all the time, and that you’ve constantly tried to trick the system, which only created frustration and disappointment with recruiters.

 

Knowing what hiring managers want to see in a resume will help you focus on only the necessary information, and will help you tailor and present that information in ways which will be a joy to read.  Before you know it, interview invitations will be coming in from all sides, and they’ll all start with a single comment:

 

“I loved your resume.”

 

If you’re not sure that your resume passes companies software systems, have your resume reviewed for free by a local professional resume writing service in Phoenix AZ.

 

 

www.domyresume.net

 

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